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Posts Tagged ‘model kits’

Lindberg Model Kits: Mini Lindy’s: An Illustrated History 1980s & 90s

posted by ChrisP 10:22 AM
Thursday, May 4, 2017

This is the 3rd and final part of an illustrated history of the Lindberg’s Mini Lindy line based on found images, catalogs and info from some modeling sites.

Part 1 – 1960s

Part 2 – 1970s

In 1980 4 more garage kits were made under the Truckin’ Big series.

All new tractor trailer kits were made in 1982.  A mix of 2 semi-trucks (GMC Astro & Ford CL-9000) and 4 trailer variations made up the 8 releases.  The first 4 in these series were reissued in slightly different packaging at some point before 1987.

In 1984 the addition of a tanker trailer lend itself to 4 more truck kits.

In 1990 the Miniature Mint Collection 2-packs were introduced.  The 1990 catalog showed 6 kits, No. 72301-06, showing 8 previous cars and 4 new ones. Ultimately only 4 of the 6 two-packs were released.  In 72303, the 1932 Ford was replaced with the newly-tooled 1990 Corvette ZR-1.  In 72304, the MG-TD was replaced with the newly-tooled Lamborghini Countach.  From what I can tell the 1990 Camaro Z28 and the Ferrari Testorossa were never tooled.

The final Mini Lindy release was the Super 8: Street Machines in 1991 feature 8 cars: 1964 Corvette, Jaguar XKE, 1970 Corvette, 1967 Mustang, Corvette ZR-1, Chevy Pickup, Lamborghini and 1968 Camaro.

Some of the dates and images were found on these fantastic sites….

87thscale.info

Diecast Destination

Swifty’s Garage

 

Commenters let us know……Should we bring these back? What kits do the modelers want to see?

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Lindberg Model Kits: Mini Lindy’s: An Illustrated History 1970s

posted by ChrisP 2:38 PM
Friday, April 28, 2017

This is part 2 of an illustrated history of the Lindberg’s Mini Lindy line based on found images, catalogs and info from some modeling sites.

Part 1 – 1960s

In 1970 the existing kits from the 60s were rereleased with new packaging and item numbers; 8 under the name 1971 Hot Shot and 8 under the name Mod Rod which included psychedelic flower decals.  Other Mod Rod versions of previous cars were made available though a mail-in promotion; they came in plain boxes but included Mod Rod decals and instructions. These included the Porsche Carrera, the “1971” Corvette, the Ford Mustang, the Jaguar XKE and probably more.

In 1971 8 of the original trucks were rereleased under the name Big Wheels. That same year seven new cars were released under the name 1972 Super Sport.  The ’68 corvette was included to round off the 8.  New cars included the Cadillac Eldorado, Lincoln Continental Mark III, Chevrolet Vega, Buick Riviera,  Gremlin, Monte Carlo and Pontiac Grand Prix (in catalog as Grand Ville).  The Super Stock series are some of the more difficult to find Mini Lindy kits.  One interesting thing to note is that the Pickup Camper was a Ford now it is a Chevy.  The box art is the same as the 1960s but has been altered slightly.  I believed the pickup was altered for a dealer promotion, because the Camper can be found in pink & orange striped Chevy promo boxes.  The chrome grilles look different but the bodies are similar enough that the tool may have just been altered.  It still has the number 22 on the underside of the body.

In 1972 some of the trucks were released in 2-packs.

In 1975 10 trucks, vans and bus were released under the Hi Rollers series.  The back of the packaging showed all the releases except for the 2 buses.

In 1976 8 cars were rereleased in the Speedy Wheels series.

In 1977 the Van Go series added a new twist to 8 previous cars with bold graphics and glitter in the injection plastic.

In 1979 the Car and Garage Kit series include a plastic garage with windows and an opening garage door. The Cadillac Eldorado and Lincoln Continental Mark III returned for the first and last time.

Look for my next post for part 3 – the 80s & 90s.

Some of the dates and images were found on these fantastic sites….

87thscale.info

Diecast Destination

Swifty’s Garage

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Lindberg Model Kits: Mini Lindy’s: An Illustrated History 1960s

posted by ChrisP 5:12 PM
Friday, April 21, 2017

This is an illustrated history of the Lindberg’s Mini Lindy line based on found images, catalogs and info from some modeling sites.

Part 1 – 1960s

The first 24 Mini Lindy cars were produced between 1967 and 1968 with the first 16 appearing in the 1968 catalog.  The vehicles were HO scale plastic kits that included clear parts, chrome parts, metal axles, rubber tires and a decal sheet. They came in black boxes with the model illustration appearing in a white oval.  On the reverse side appeared a rear view of the vehicle.  Three variations on the packaging appeared: a basic box, box with a flap for hanging and a cellophane version that was just the basic box with the back illo cut out. On the back of the flapped version was a list of kits numbered 1 to 32, though at that time only 24 had produced.  The list also changed a bit on kits 17-24.

In 1969 7 “red box” kits were released; kits were numbered 25 to 31.  An oddity… #32 Ryder Moving Truck appeared in a black box.  Not sure of the release date but given that the kits were released in groups of 8 generally I would think this would have been released with #25-31, but I don’t know.  The list on the flaps changed again to reflect the final 32 kits.  Seems as though #25 Pontiac Firebird, #28 Jaguar D, #29 Bobtail T, #31 Station Wagon Vista-Cruiser, #32 Stake Truck, and #32 Oil Truck were unproduced.  The 1969-70 catalog still only showed the first 16 kits.

Look for my next post for part 2…….

Some of the dates and images were found on these fantastic sites….

87thscale.info

Diecast Destination

Swifty’s Garage

Lindberg Model kits: Big 1/16 Scale Serpent Sho-Go Rod!

posted by ChrisP 9:00 AM
Friday, April 14, 2017

After 47 years and some tooling work the Serpent Sho-Go Rod is ready to roll again! The kit has had quite a few variations over its long history. The first appearance was in Pyro’s 1965 catalog as the TeeNT Sho-Go Street Rod and the Gee-T Custom Show Car.  The Serpent variation first appeared in 1966 as the Cobra Tee Way-Out Rod.

In 1970 skis where added to the Gee-T and it was re-christened as the Sno-Skeeter, the Cobra Tee became the Serpent, and new parts were tooled for the 4th version – the Laramie Stage Ghost.  In 1979 Lindberg released the TeeNT as the Bull Horn Street Rod. Supposedly, it was renamed as such because, when loonies at Lindberg obtained the tooling, they thought that the horns from the Laramie were meant to go with the TeeNT.

The Serpent is a big, fantastic rod at 1/16 scale. It sits at over 8 inches long and 5 1/2 inches tall. The kit features snakeskin textured side panels & upholstery, detailed engine, rubber whitewall tires and slicks, an extra cobra throne seat, antique cowl lamps, custom bucket seats with cobra headrests, seat belts, custom exhaust pipes and twin steering controls.  Parts will come injected in blue, black and clear.  Alterations to the kit include improving the way the bucket sits on the frame and adjusting the stance of the 3rd seat to better match the box art.

For those wanting a more custom look the Serpent comes with a slew of bonus parts including front & Rear fenders, chrome wheel covers, chrome gas tank, alternate cowl lamps, and chrome air cleaners.  An all new feature for the Serpent is a large, snake-themed decal sheet. Slithering your way this May!

 

 

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Lindberg Model kits: Jolly Roger Series: Hex Marks the Spot!

posted by ChrisP 4:31 PM
Thursday, April 6, 2017

“Set adrift and drudges weak
 Pursuit of yer gold and sapphire lot
 What ye find is not what ye seek
 When a HEX marks the spot.”

Emerging from the depths of the Round 2 tooling bank comes a new addition to Lindberg’s Jolly Roger Series. Hex Marks the Spot begins a haunting lineup of 1:12 scale figural kits. This memorable kit from 1972 stands 6 inches tall and 8 inches wide.  It portrays a cursed pirate captain steering his “skeleton” crew in search of a deadly treasure.  The all plastic assembly glue-together kit nearly snaps-together.   The model is highly detailed and well sculpted, featuring realistic wood-grain and weathering  on the deck and crates.  The cannon features corrosion after spending years on the dicey sea.  Additional details like cannon balls, a skull and bones are included to flesh out the scene.  The model jumps to life when a second skeleton lunges from a crate with dagger in hand to pinpoint the location of the lost booty on the treasure map.  A BONUS pirate medallion and coin are also included.

Decals include a massive skull and cross bones, treasure map, blue or yellow lantern glass, stripe detail for captain’s vest, decorative band for skull cap, royal crest for stolen crate, chest designs, multiple crests for the cannon and decorations for the ship’s wheel.  The decal sheet even includes the poem above.  Be sure to tell your usual retailer to reserve your copy!

 

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As part 2 of our look into the packaging for the new MPC Eagle with Cargo Pod model kit, we have a special article written by Jim Small. Jim is our go-to guy for all of our sci-fi model kit buildup work. He also supplies endless consulting on all of our sci-fi kits and especially everything Space:1999 related. In our last blog post, I mentioned that I had him on the hook to do a little scratch-building/heavily altering a set of Eagle nose cone parts to show a wrecked nose cone for the box bottom and a few stand-in mockup parts that could be used for reference for the box illustration. You’ll find, as you read, that Jim really went above and beyond what I asked for. My kudos and many thanks to him for that!

 

Special Box Art Effects, One Shot at a Time.

James Small, www.smallartworks.ca

The newest release in Round 2/MPC’s fantastic Space: 1999 lineup is the Cargo Eagle with Winch Pod. As with every great kit, there needs to be great packaging. The work prepared for the box cover needs to be engaging and authentic to satisfy discerning fans today.  Jamie Hood, Round 2’s senior designer, product development expert and resident Sci Fi artist is, as usual, right on top of his game with the soon to be revealed new boxtop design showing the iconic Moonbase Alpha workhorse in the fantasy situation as seen in the opening episode, “Breakaway”!

Although another one of Jamie’s gorgeous hand painted illustrations will grace the main box cover, he needed some model photography to flesh out the box bottom and sides to show off how great this kit is, and he asked me to help produce some of that work. I had been supplied test shots of the new Cargo Pod and accessories which I built, finished and used in conjunction with an existing Eagle model I had previously built.

Jamie knows how much I love to photograph models in a dramatic fashion, so he asked me to try and recreate some original scenes from the show using the actual built and painted kit.  Jamie started by showing me some screen grabs of the scenes he wanted to recreate. Because of the predetermined photographic layout Jamie had provided, I knew that some of the pictures had to be choreographed somewhat differently than the screen grabs to accommodate the spread.

Two models made using test shots of the new Cargo pod and accessories, one painted, the other left unpainted but decaled to show how great the kit can look even without any painting at all! The special machined aluminum accessory sets are also attached to the models.

Normally I like to do all my photography completely “in camera” with no digital effects, but in this case because of the limited space in my shop and the expanse of the scenes needed I had to cheat and use Photoshop to assemble the various elements that had to be shot to create the visuals. Also, one of the shots needed to have three Eagles in the picture, but I only had one finished model at my disposal at the time so I had to do some digital manipulation. The picture would also show the red striped Rescue Eagle, but I had only a finished plain white passenger pod available which was earmarked for a customer so I couldn’t paint it. Jamie would later add the red stripes in digitally.

I also needed to scratch build some props not included in the kit to make the scenes required for the box art so I built some quick-and-dirty replicas to scale with the 22” model to provide the necessary backdrop. I made correctly scaled light stands, a simple rectangular landing pad matching the original, a nuclear waste disposal area cone and a “pit” that contained the canisters which matched what was seen in “Breakaway”. Jamie also liked the idea of showing the Eagle carrying away the damaged nosecone as seen in the episode “Missing Link”, so he sent me a spare nosecone from his parts bin which I re-worked to simulate the banged-up cockpit section.

Making the props was a LOT of fun for me as I do love to scratch build and modify stuff. It gives me some real creative license as well as the challenge of reproducing the original models used in the show from scratch. Time was limited so in true traditional VFX style I built everything with just the photography in mind. The waste area cone, for example, was made from a disposable plastic martini style cup and detailed to suit.

The “nuke dome” being started, the cone cut from a plastic martini glass of the type seen at left which coincidentally has the close-enough-to-work angled sides.

Details added to the cone using sheet and strip styrene.

The top of the cone is turned on a lathe from a piece of leftover resin from another project.

The “damaged” nosecone was detailed only on the side that the camera would see. I cut out panels, detailed the voids with kit bashing and made dents on the surface, simulating the damage incurred during a crash landing, using heat from a small blow torch (very gingerly used!) and a Dremel tool. The opposite side, left mostly unfinished, had a plug-in mount installed where the left sensor dish would be so it could be propped up with the supporting rod (simply a wooden dowel) positioned away from the camera.

The Eagle nosecone modified with kitbashed parts put into into holes cut out of the kit and painted to resemble crash damage.

I also put functioning LEDs into the light stands and the cone beacon to add authenticity.

Four light stands were fabricated using sheet styrene and square tubing. These would later be mounted to a base which supplied the power using a 3 volt battery box underneath.

Testing the lights on the stands. Three 5mm “Straw Hat” style LED’s were used in each stand.

The red areas on the trunk of the light stands were also to appear lit up, but this was a VFX cheat, borrowed from Brian Johnson and his crew when they lit up the main model of Moonbase Alpha’s windows, by using red reflective “Scotchlite” tape applied that would bounce the light back to the camera when it was shone from the camera’s point of view, just the same way road signs are lit with car headlights.

All the finished props built for the box art photo shoot.

Some of the shots I did were the relatively simple ones, those shot against a black velvet background for the outer space beauty shots of the model shown on the sides of the box cover. Because I knew that the motif of colour that Jamie had designed for dramatic impact was to have a significant red tint, I used a red fill light to enhance the shots. I also shot a couple using green and blue fill light to impart a more colourful tapestry in case he had some other ideas in mind, but Jamie wisely rejected them.

The finished Cargo Eagle model shot against black velvet and fill-lit with a red spotlight for dramatic effect.

The  rectangular landing pad the Eagle is shown sitting on with its flatbed loaded with nuclear waste canisters was made quickly from sheet styrene using screen grabs as a guide for proportion and detailing to scale with the 22” kit. Coincidentally, the actual VFX shot for the episode used the like-scaled studio model 22” Eagle!

Jamie H. butting in here. Just for the record. I discussed making prop “stand-in’s” with Jim, all I asked for were rough placeholders. I told him to take some photos of the Eagle matching the angles shown in the unloading scene because it was a nice angle of the ship. Much to my surprise he sent me some photos one morning of the platform itself! Textbook example of “over-delivering.”

Lunar regolith was simply made from sprinkled concrete powder on the 3 foot square work surface. The waste cone was repositioned for different exposures and assembled in Photoshop to make it look as if there were several of them in the scene. Since a true “multiple exposure” is impossible with a digital camera (I currently use a Canon Rebel T3i), this compositing technique was necessary. The same thing was done with the four light stands to make it appear that there were more of them in the scene.

All the shots taken for the Eagle sitting on the pad with the waste cones surrounding it. Several shots were done identical except for lighting effects and the waste cone prop repositioned for each shot so that when composited, it will look like many cones surround the model using the single prop. Not all the pictures were used in the final comp, of course, but I took a lot of extra shots to provide different options.

The models were all photographed with the camera mounted to a tripod and suitably lit. Time exposures had to be used to achieve maximum depth of field. The hanging “damaged” nosecone and waste canisters were solid mounted and shot separately to be matted in later, as just the slightest movement during exposure with them hanging off the Eagle would have blurred them in the picture.

In some of the examples of the raw pictures shown you can that see some of the elements were shot against a green screen thinking this would be helpful in isolating them for compositing, but in reality this caused more problems than it solved due to fringing and “green spill”, so that idea was abandoned and I just used the ones shot against black velvet instead.

Some of the elements shot separately which would later be combined into the finished VFX pictures. Not all shown were used, some were used that are not seen here. Some colour correction and sweetening would also be employed to maximize the look of the finished composites.

Two of the scenes also required mountains for the background and foreground hills. Because of the limited space on the table I actually made the distant mountains from small pieces of carved foam, sprayed with gray primer which further textured them and sprinkled with concrete dust. These mountains in reality were just about 6 inches wide or so, but shot in extreme closeup and lit harshly. They were simply matted in behind the models. A similar technique was also used by Johnson’s VFX crew for distant mountain ranges, but without the aid of digital compositing! Instead, they had the miniature mountain photographs blown up and mounted to large wooden flats, propped up behind their model sets. I had considered doing the same thing, but it was far less expensive for me to plop them in using Photoshop.

In addition to these VFX shots I also took a series of photographs that were designed to help Jamie compose his painting, but he will cover those in his own article shortly, and are therefore not presented here. I also shot several “orthographic” pictures of the finished model for the box tray sides to show decal placement and paint schemes for the consumer to use as reference. The miniature was propped up in front of a black velvet backdrop, suitably lit and shot with a 300mm telephoto lens from about 25 feet away to help eliminate perspective distortion, making the picture plane look as close to a blueprint-like image as possible.

The three finished composites using the previously photographed elements. You will find these images gracing the box tray. Compare to the inspirational screen caps from the show.

I always have a lot of fun building models, but just as fun is when I have the opportunity to recreate the spectacular scenes that remind us why we loved a TV show like Space: 1999 in the first place.

Special thanks to Jamie Hood and all the wonderful people at Round 2 for finding a place for my work to be included as a part of the box art that will soon be on hobby store shelves for everyone to enjoy, containing yet another fantastic kit. Dreams are continuing to come true, thanks to Round 2!

You are welcome, Jim.

If you want to learn more about model photography, be sure to check out the article Jim wrote on the Central Nova Scotia Modelers web page here.

Next time, we will reveal the box illustration…

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Lindberg Model kits: 5 Space Ship of The Future! Back from the Past

posted by ChrisP 6:23 PM
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Blasting from the past is Lindberg’s 5 Space Ships of the Future.  Considered to be Lindberg’s most iconic and sought after kit, the futuristic 5-pack will finally be available for the first time since its originally release way back in 1958.  Along with 5 complete model kits, the release will features vintage boxart, retro-inspired decals, and a few new twists.  The 5 decal sheets are remastered from the 1958 versions but with a better fit and details, and include all new decal options inspired by the kits rich histories. Also for the first time ever parts are injected in a spaceship grey.

The all new full color tray features amazing models painted, assembled and photographed by E. James Small.  Check out more of his work at smallartworks.ca.

AMT Model kits: 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me Gone!

posted by ChrisP 4:50 PM
Thursday, January 5, 2017

amt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging

Racing down the track this month from AMT is the 1/25 scale 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me Gone. A historic car in drag racing lore, the 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me GONE was built and driven by Chrysler transmission lab tech Roger Lindamood. Implanted with a 426 big block, the car could hit a 12 second quarter mile. AMT puts this kit on the starting line. It features white, clear and chrome parts with rubber tires. An illustrated instruction sheet assists assembly and a full color decal sheet rounds out the product.

  • 1/25 scale, skill 2, paint & cement required
  • Iconic drag racer
  • Authentic detail inside and out
  • Opening hood
  • White, chrome and clear parts
  • Goodyear drag slick rubber tires
  • Full-color Cartograf decals
  • SPECIAL FEATURE: Newly tooled Torq Thrust racing rims, stock steel rims, hubcaps, and multiple hood scoop options!

Get yours before it’s GONE!

amt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging-bottomamt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging-topamt987-new-parts-sprue-with-chromeamt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-decals

***We’ve gotten reports that the boxes say “300” rather than “330”. We are aware of that and we will make a correction on future production runs.

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1:32 Kitbash: 1930 Ford Model A Roadster Pickup – Part 3

posted by ChrisP 7:22 PM
Sunday, November 27, 2016

Goto PART 1 PART 2

1930-model-a-pickup-part-03

This is the final part of my 1930 Ford Model A Roaster Pickup kitbash using the Lindberg 1:32 Customizable Show Rod 2-pack and Lindberg 1:32 1930 Ford Model A Pickup.

Parts are painted, now it is time for assembly.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-10

As mentioned in part 2, I assembled the motor using the “Rear Mill Bucket” instructions.  As shown above.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-11

Next I assembled the frame (A1), body (A3+A4+A5+A6), dash (A17), steering wheel (A19), windshield (a9), glass (A25), bed (A7a), grille (A2), tail gate (A8), and interior of the cab (A10) as shown in the Model A Pickup instructions.  I replaced the gear shift with the chromed one from the Super Roadster (part R10).

 1930-model-a-pickup-step-12
Front axle (R13) was slid into slot at the front of the frame.  I attached wheel hubs (R55) and small wheels (R27 & R28) to front axle.
1930-model-a-pickup-step-13
I attached drive shaft (R30), wheel hubs (R55) and large wheels (R32 & R33) to frame and engine.
1930-model-a-pickup-step-14
At this point I also attached the exhaust (B33 & B32).
1930-model-a-pickup-step-15
Before I could attach the radiator (A2) I needed to make supports.  For this I used part A12.  I cut two segments from A12 and glued them between the radiator and firewall.
1930-model-a-pickup-step-16
I glued the headlight lenses (A26) in to the headlight assembly (A18).  I cut the assembly as shown above and cemented the headlights to the side of the radiator.
1930-model-a-pickup-step-17
1930-model-a-pickup-step-21
I finished it up by attaching the hubcabs (I went with B38) and the radius rods (R44).
Here is the final 1:32 1930 Ford Model A Roadster Pickup Rod.
1930-model-a-pickup-step-30
I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out.  Next I am going to see if I can do something with the remaining parts from this build and maybe another one of the Lindberg 1:32 kits.

 

1:32 Kitbash: 1930 Ford Model A Roadster Pickup – Part 2

posted by ChrisP 5:49 PM
Thursday, November 10, 2016

Goto PART 1

1930-model-a-pickup-part-02

This is part 2 of my 1930 Ford Model A Roaster Pickup kitbash using the Lindberg 1:32 Customizable Show Rod 2-pack and Lindberg 1:32 1930 Ford Model A Pickup.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-00-sprues

Above are the parts from each kit that were used.  Note that I will reference 1930 Ford Model A Pickup kit part with an “A” in front of the part number, “B” for the Lucky Bucket and “R” for the Super Roadster.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-01

First I removed the fenders from the frame (A1).  Cutting along the the red lines as shown above. I discarded the fenders (i.e. set them aside for future projects).

1930-model-a-pickup-step-02

Next I separated the hood from the cowl halves (A5,A6), cutting along the red line.  The hood halves were not used on this build, so discard.  The cowl halves (A5,A6) and the body sides (A3,A4) were then glued together.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-031930-model-a-pickup-step-04

I wanted to shorten the pickup bed (A7).  The excess is be used in next step, so you would need to remove at least 7mm, I went with 11mm.  I will refer to the halves now as parts A7a and A7b.  I also trimmed 11mm off the bed on frame (A1).  The excess from A1 is discarded.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-05

The body (A3+A4+A5+A6) is missing a firewall so I used part A7b to create it.  I cut it into the pieces shown above and then cut 3 pieces down to fit in the cowl (A5+A6).  The pieces were about 7mm wide and A7c was cut to fit the curve of the cowl.  Parts A7c, A7d and A7e were glued to the body.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-06

Next I cut a “hole” in interior’s floor (A10) to make room for the drive shaft (R30) from the Super Roadster.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-07

I cut the hood ornament from the grille (A2).  I didn’t like it.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-08

I used the motor halves (B16,B15) from the Lucky Bucket.  I cut a half circle from the end of the support rods that enable the engine to sit perfectly in place on the frame (A1) with very little modification.  Note I had to cut a half circle notch off the frame at the front of the engine to leave room for the belt (B43).  For the motor assembly I used the “Rear Mill Bucket” version, option B on the instructions for the Lucky Bucket, but with different exhaust.  I will show this in my next post.

1930-model-a-pickup-step-09

Next I painted the parts as shown above.  My paint scheme was inspired by the vintage Lindberg Freaky Ford kit. (as mentioned in Part 1) I painted the frame (A1), body (A3+A4+A5+A6), dash (A17), bed (A7a), grille (A2), and tail gate (A8) a metallic grape purple, first hitting them with a dull medium blue then the purple to give the color a little more depth.  I painted the wood planks on the bed to look like wood and the grille and gauges chrome.  The interior of the cab and the seats were painted tan.  The front radius rod (A12), headlight assembly (A18), bumper (A20), windshield frame (A9) and 4 wheel hubs (R55) were painted chrome.  The small front wheels (R27,R28), rear wheels (R32,R33) and drive shaft were painted black.  The rims on the wheel were painted orange and whitewalls were added.

Look for my next post for final modifications and assembly.

 

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