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Posts Tagged ‘models’

AMT Model kits: 3in1 Customizing Boat!

posted by ChrisP 5:13 PM
Friday, July 28, 2017

Summer vacation is not over yet!  Cool yourself off with this hot item!

AMT is bringing back the 3in1! Customizing Boat.  This summer have endless fun by building this kit 3 different ways – an Inboard Runabout, a Sea Going Dragster or a Custom Speedboat.  Features include two detailed motor options, parts injected in white, chrome parts, hinged engine doors and custom fins.  The included trailer features metal axles, rubber tires, hubcaps and optional fender skirts.  The decals are remastered for better fit and realism, and include new decals to match the vintage box art that were unavailable in previous releases.  The packaging includes vibrant, vintage graphics and a full color tray displaying photos of the 3 completed versions.
So keep a lookout this summer for the AMT 1/25 3in1 Customizing Boat.

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Lindberg Model kits: Big 1/16 Scale Serpent Sho-Go Rod!

posted by ChrisP 9:00 AM
Friday, April 14, 2017

After 47 years and some tooling work the Serpent Sho-Go Rod is ready to roll again! The kit has had quite a few variations over its long history. The first appearance was in Pyro’s 1965 catalog as the TeeNT Sho-Go Street Rod and the Gee-T Custom Show Car.  The Serpent variation first appeared in 1966 as the Cobra Tee Way-Out Rod.

In 1970 skis where added to the Gee-T and it was re-christened as the Sno-Skeeter, the Cobra Tee became the Serpent, and new parts were tooled for the 4th version – the Laramie Stage Ghost.  In 1979 Lindberg released the TeeNT as the Bull Horn Street Rod. Supposedly, it was renamed as such because, when loonies at Lindberg obtained the tooling, they thought that the horns from the Laramie were meant to go with the TeeNT.

The Serpent is a big, fantastic rod at 1/16 scale. It sits at over 8 inches long and 5 1/2 inches tall. The kit features snakeskin textured side panels & upholstery, detailed engine, rubber whitewall tires and slicks, an extra cobra throne seat, antique cowl lamps, custom bucket seats with cobra headrests, seat belts, custom exhaust pipes and twin steering controls.  Parts will come injected in blue, black and clear.  Alterations to the kit include improving the way the bucket sits on the frame and adjusting the stance of the 3rd seat to better match the box art.

For those wanting a more custom look the Serpent comes with a slew of bonus parts including front & Rear fenders, chrome wheel covers, chrome gas tank, alternate cowl lamps, and chrome air cleaners.  An all new feature for the Serpent is a large, snake-themed decal sheet. Slithering your way this May!

 

 

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Lindberg Model kits: Jolly Roger Series: Hex Marks the Spot!

posted by ChrisP 4:31 PM
Thursday, April 6, 2017

“Set adrift and drudges weak
 Pursuit of yer gold and sapphire lot
 What ye find is not what ye seek
 When a HEX marks the spot.”

Emerging from the depths of the Round 2 tooling bank comes a new addition to Lindberg’s Jolly Roger Series. Hex Marks the Spot begins a haunting lineup of 1:12 scale figural kits. This memorable kit from 1972 stands 6 inches tall and 8 inches wide.  It portrays a cursed pirate captain steering his “skeleton” crew in search of a deadly treasure.  The all plastic assembly glue-together kit nearly snaps-together.   The model is highly detailed and well sculpted, featuring realistic wood-grain and weathering  on the deck and crates.  The cannon features corrosion after spending years on the dicey sea.  Additional details like cannon balls, a skull and bones are included to flesh out the scene.  The model jumps to life when a second skeleton lunges from a crate with dagger in hand to pinpoint the location of the lost booty on the treasure map.  A BONUS pirate medallion and coin are also included.

Decals include a massive skull and cross bones, treasure map, blue or yellow lantern glass, stripe detail for captain’s vest, decorative band for skull cap, royal crest for stolen crate, chest designs, multiple crests for the cannon and decorations for the ship’s wheel.  The decal sheet even includes the poem above.  Be sure to tell your usual retailer to reserve your copy!

 

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AMT Model kits: 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me Gone!

posted by ChrisP 4:50 PM
Thursday, January 5, 2017

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Racing down the track this month from AMT is the 1/25 scale 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me Gone. A historic car in drag racing lore, the 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me GONE was built and driven by Chrysler transmission lab tech Roger Lindamood. Implanted with a 426 big block, the car could hit a 12 second quarter mile. AMT puts this kit on the starting line. It features white, clear and chrome parts with rubber tires. An illustrated instruction sheet assists assembly and a full color decal sheet rounds out the product.

  • 1/25 scale, skill 2, paint & cement required
  • Iconic drag racer
  • Authentic detail inside and out
  • Opening hood
  • White, chrome and clear parts
  • Goodyear drag slick rubber tires
  • Full-color Cartograf decals
  • SPECIAL FEATURE: Newly tooled Torq Thrust racing rims, stock steel rims, hubcaps, and multiple hood scoop options!

Get yours before it’s GONE!

amt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging-bottomamt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging-topamt987-new-parts-sprue-with-chromeamt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-decals

***We’ve gotten reports that the boxes say “300” rather than “330”. We are aware of that and we will make a correction on future production runs.

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Lindberg Model kits: 1959 22ft Owens Deluxe Cruiser Boat!

posted by ChrisP 5:29 PM
Thursday, September 29, 2016

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Following the release of the 1959 Century Coronado, we have the 2nd boat found hidden in the Lindberg tool collection — the 1959 22ft Owens Deluxe Cruiser with Twin 50HP Outboard Motors!  With smooth lines and sturdy built, this is the roomiest 22 foot yacht. The combination of distinctive two-tone colors makes a beautiful boat and the large deck and spacious cabin makes a comfortable experience. Equipped with twin outboard engines – this luxury cruiser has been designed to combine performance and functional benefits with the beauty and comfort.

Like the Coronado the Owens boat also is connected to another famous designer, Raymond Loewy.  Raymond Loewy was know for creating logos for Exxon, Shell, BP, TWA, Nabisco, Quaker, and the U.S. Postal Service.  He created the USCG stripe as seen on Lindberg’s US Coast Guard Patrol Boat.  Most notably he redesign the glass Coke bottle, replacing the embossing with white letters and changing the contours to create the iconic shape we know today.

Fatures include: full color decals, vintage boxart, display base, chrome parts, and easy to follow instructions.

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Lindberg Model kits: 1620 Pilgram Mayflower!

posted by ChrisP 5:12 PM
Thursday, August 18, 2016

HL215-12-Mayflower-packaging

This month set sail with the Pilgrims on the Mayflower.  Build this 1:250 replica of the famous ship that establish the first English settlement in the new world.  The Mayflower is joining Lindberg’s growing fleet of small scale sailing ships.  At 5.5 inches long the kit is packed full of detail with molded flags, preformed sails, decorative hull and wood grain deck.

The Mayflower includes new packaging featuring the 1963 boxart, easy-to-follow instructions, display base with nameplate and Cartograf decals.   The new decal sheet includes flags, name for display and stern decoration.

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Lindberg Model kits: 1959 Century Coronado Boat!

posted by ChrisP 4:30 PM
Thursday, August 4, 2016

HL221-12-Century-Coronado-pkg-o-1

For those fans of mid-century chrome and bubble tops Lindberg has a kit for you.  We found a few boats hidden in our tool collection that haven’t been seen since the 1960s and the first one to be released is the 1959 Century Coronado.    The 21-foot Coronado was the flagship of Century’s line of runabouts and was known for its luxury and styling.  The boat was designed by Richard Arbib, mostly notable for his watch and automobile designs, including the 1957 Hudson Hornet.  If you would like to know more about the Coronado and see some pictures check out “The Cadillac of Boats”on WoodyBoater.com.  Also check out some of the articles at Forgottenfiberglass.com or CarStyling.ru about Richard Arbib’s car designs.

Features include: full color decals, vintage boxart, display base, chrome parts, plastic flags, sliding canopy, and a removable engine cover.

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Above: Richard Arbib’s Coronado designs and photos of the real thing.  Below: More of Arbib’s designs including the 1957 Hudson Hornet, the 1952 Packard Pan-American Roadster, the 1954 Ford Atmos, and the 1956 Astra-Gnome.

arbib

Lindberg Table Top Navy: HMS King George V and HMS Dorsetshire

posted by ChrisP 5:14 PM
Thursday, February 18, 2016

First, for those of you I haven’t met my name is Chris Purvis.  Last year I manned the booth at Wonderfest with Jamie.  I work primarily on the Lindberg/Hawk line doing the military and historical kits (airplanes, naval boats, sailing ships, tanks, etc.).  The occasional car or oddball kit will also end up on my desk.  Before switching over to Lindberg in 2014, I worked on the Forever Fun line.  Next month I will be celebrating 3 years with Round2.  Also, I am a big nerd for movies and vintage sci fi, so if you want to get off topic in your comments go that direction. -ChrisP

Available soon will be the 3rd 2-pack in the Lindberg Table Top Navy Series, the HMS King George V & the HMS Dorsetshire.  The kit features two World War II British Battleships in 1:1200 scale.  Like the previous ships in the series, they can be displayed as Full Hull or Waterline models.

HL439-12-TTN-2-Pack-HMS-King-George-V-&-HMS-Dorsetshire-packaging--o-1

Recently we’ve been able to acquire some of the original box art paintings used on old Pyro and Lindberg kits.  The King George V box art is from a new scan of the 1959 painting. It is amazing to see some of the original detail and brush work put into these pieces of art.

Pyro-KingGeorgeV-painting_500

For the Dorsetshire I scanned the 1959 packaging.  From my research I could not find any references to the ship ever have the depicted camouflage pattern.  I altered the image to show this known hull scheme.

Before….

dorsetshire-then

1941-HMS_Dorsetshire_500

After…

dorsetshire-now

The kit will include that hull scheme for the HMS Dorsetshire as a decal, along with a dazzle camo option for the HMS King George V.

HL439-12-TTN-2-Pack-HMS-King-George-V-&-HMS-Dorsetshire-decals

 

The 4-H model – Finishing

posted by RJ 3:56 PM
Monday, June 24, 2013

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Ensure that all paint and glue on your model is perfectly dry. It is good practice to start applying decals the day after you finish assembly and painting. Ensure also that your model is free of contaminants and dust, so nothing may be trapped underneath a decal.

Cut out all the decals you wish to apply with a sharp knife. It is not necessary to cut out the decals perfectly; rather you should leave a few millimeters around each decal to avoid cutting it accidentally.

 

Fill a bowl or shallow cup with warm water. The water should be at least lukewarm to remove the decals from the paper they are printed on, but not scalding hot. Never use boiling water to apply decals.

Hold the paper the decals are printed on with a pair of tweezers. Make sure you are not gripping a part of the decal itself under the tweezers.

We actually held the paper next to the car and gently slid the graphic onto the car. It is helpful if you get the car wet prior to sliding the graphic to help in positioning it. This will allow you a few seconds to slide the image into the place you want it.

 

Hold the paper the decal is printed on close to the part you are applying the decal to. The edge of the paper must be lying on the edge of the part, so the decal is transferred immediately from paper to part. Using a clean, wet brush, maneuver the decal onto the part and position it accordingly. Ensure that all air bubbles and creases are removed from the decal by pushing them out with the brush.

 

Dry the decal by very gently by dabbing it with a clean paper towel. The decal should be left alone for an hour to allow it to dry completely. Until then, it may be accidentally repositioned. To reposition a partially dry decal, simply apply some warm water with the brush and maneuver it back into position.

 

 

 

A few things we have learned…

  • Remember that whatever paint-removing solvent you use, it must not harm plastic.

We do have a minor issue under the car where the solvent degraded the plastic a little,but it is underneath…

  • Keep all empty sprues when you have finished assembly. They are useful for stirring paint, or making tools that won’t scratch the model you are working on.

These are also helpful for applying glue and you can throw them away when done.

  • Keep all unused decals. You may later find them useful for other models.
  • Some parts are more easily painted while left on the sprue.This is true particularly of very small parts for the engine. He chose to leave some the original color and chrome but that is an artistic choice.
  • A torn decal is not useless. Careful positioning of the damaged portions can restore the decal to a whole appearance.This is where wetting the model can be handy and allow you to slide the decal into position.
  • If your paint is too thick to feed through the airbrush, try diluting it with a small amount of rubbing alcohol. The alcohol thins the paint while it is in the airbrush, but evaporates soon after leaving it.
  • When applying solvents, paints and glues, do so in a well-ventilated area. Observe all warnings and instructions printed on all your materials and tools.
  • Knives and other sharp tools must be handled by experienced and responsible persons only.
  • Small parts may pose a choking hazard to small children and animals.

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