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Posts Tagged ‘models’

AMT Model kits: 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me Gone!

posted by ChrisP 4:50 PM
Thursday, January 5, 2017

amt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging

Racing down the track this month from AMT is the 1/25 scale 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me Gone. A historic car in drag racing lore, the 1964 Dodge 330 Color Me GONE was built and driven by Chrysler transmission lab tech Roger Lindamood. Implanted with a 426 big block, the car could hit a 12 second quarter mile. AMT puts this kit on the starting line. It features white, clear and chrome parts with rubber tires. An illustrated instruction sheet assists assembly and a full color decal sheet rounds out the product.

  • 1/25 scale, skill 2, paint & cement required
  • Iconic drag racer
  • Authentic detail inside and out
  • Opening hood
  • White, chrome and clear parts
  • Goodyear drag slick rubber tires
  • Full-color Cartograf decals
  • SPECIAL FEATURE: Newly tooled Torq Thrust racing rims, stock steel rims, hubcaps, and multiple hood scoop options!

Get yours before it’s GONE!

amt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging-bottomamt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-packaging-topamt987-new-parts-sprue-with-chromeamt987-12-color-me-gone-1964-dodge-330-super-stock-decals

***We’ve gotten reports that the boxes say “300” rather than “330”. We are aware of that and we will make a correction on future production runs.

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Lindberg Model kits: 1959 22ft Owens Deluxe Cruiser Boat!

posted by ChrisP 5:29 PM
Thursday, September 29, 2016

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Following the release of the 1959 Century Coronado, we have the 2nd boat found hidden in the Lindberg tool collection — the 1959 22ft Owens Deluxe Cruiser with Twin 50HP Outboard Motors!  With smooth lines and sturdy built, this is the roomiest 22 foot yacht. The combination of distinctive two-tone colors makes a beautiful boat and the large deck and spacious cabin makes a comfortable experience. Equipped with twin outboard engines – this luxury cruiser has been designed to combine performance and functional benefits with the beauty and comfort.

Like the Coronado the Owens boat also is connected to another famous designer, Raymond Loewy.  Raymond Loewy was know for creating logos for Exxon, Shell, BP, TWA, Nabisco, Quaker, and the U.S. Postal Service.  He created the USCG stripe as seen on Lindberg’s US Coast Guard Patrol Boat.  Most notably he redesign the glass Coke bottle, replacing the embossing with white letters and changing the contours to create the iconic shape we know today.

Fatures include: full color decals, vintage boxart, display base, chrome parts, and easy to follow instructions.

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Lindberg Model kits: 1620 Pilgram Mayflower!

posted by ChrisP 5:12 PM
Thursday, August 18, 2016

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This month set sail with the Pilgrims on the Mayflower.  Build this 1:250 replica of the famous ship that establish the first English settlement in the new world.  The Mayflower is joining Lindberg’s growing fleet of small scale sailing ships.  At 5.5 inches long the kit is packed full of detail with molded flags, preformed sails, decorative hull and wood grain deck.

The Mayflower includes new packaging featuring the 1963 boxart, easy-to-follow instructions, display base with nameplate and Cartograf decals.   The new decal sheet includes flags, name for display and stern decoration.

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Lindberg Model kits: 1959 Century Coronado Boat!

posted by ChrisP 4:30 PM
Thursday, August 4, 2016

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For those fans of mid-century chrome and bubble tops Lindberg has a kit for you.  We found a few boats hidden in our tool collection that haven’t been seen since the 1960s and the first one to be released is the 1959 Century Coronado.    The 21-foot Coronado was the flagship of Century’s line of runabouts and was known for its luxury and styling.  The boat was designed by Richard Arbib, mostly notable for his watch and automobile designs, including the 1957 Hudson Hornet.  If you would like to know more about the Coronado and see some pictures check out “The Cadillac of Boats”on WoodyBoater.com.  Also check out some of the articles at Forgottenfiberglass.com or CarStyling.ru about Richard Arbib’s car designs.

Features include: full color decals, vintage boxart, display base, chrome parts, plastic flags, sliding canopy, and a removable engine cover.

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Above: Richard Arbib’s Coronado designs and photos of the real thing.  Below: More of Arbib’s designs including the 1957 Hudson Hornet, the 1952 Packard Pan-American Roadster, the 1954 Ford Atmos, and the 1956 Astra-Gnome.

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Lindberg Table Top Navy: HMS King George V and HMS Dorsetshire

posted by ChrisP 5:14 PM
Thursday, February 18, 2016

First, for those of you I haven’t met my name is Chris Purvis.  Last year I manned the booth at Wonderfest with Jamie.  I work primarily on the Lindberg/Hawk line doing the military and historical kits (airplanes, naval boats, sailing ships, tanks, etc.).  The occasional car or oddball kit will also end up on my desk.  Before switching over to Lindberg in 2014, I worked on the Forever Fun line.  Next month I will be celebrating 3 years with Round2.  Also, I am a big nerd for movies and vintage sci fi, so if you want to get off topic in your comments go that direction. -ChrisP

Available soon will be the 3rd 2-pack in the Lindberg Table Top Navy Series, the HMS King George V & the HMS Dorsetshire.  The kit features two World War II British Battleships in 1:1200 scale.  Like the previous ships in the series, they can be displayed as Full Hull or Waterline models.

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Recently we’ve been able to acquire some of the original box art paintings used on old Pyro and Lindberg kits.  The King George V box art is from a new scan of the 1959 painting. It is amazing to see some of the original detail and brush work put into these pieces of art.

Pyro-KingGeorgeV-painting_500

For the Dorsetshire I scanned the 1959 packaging.  From my research I could not find any references to the ship ever have the depicted camouflage pattern.  I altered the image to show this known hull scheme.

Before….

dorsetshire-then

1941-HMS_Dorsetshire_500

After…

dorsetshire-now

The kit will include that hull scheme for the HMS Dorsetshire as a decal, along with a dazzle camo option for the HMS King George V.

HL439-12-TTN-2-Pack-HMS-King-George-V-&-HMS-Dorsetshire-decals

 

The 4-H model – Finishing

posted by RJ 3:56 PM
Monday, June 24, 2013

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Ensure that all paint and glue on your model is perfectly dry. It is good practice to start applying decals the day after you finish assembly and painting. Ensure also that your model is free of contaminants and dust, so nothing may be trapped underneath a decal.

Cut out all the decals you wish to apply with a sharp knife. It is not necessary to cut out the decals perfectly; rather you should leave a few millimeters around each decal to avoid cutting it accidentally.

 

Fill a bowl or shallow cup with warm water. The water should be at least lukewarm to remove the decals from the paper they are printed on, but not scalding hot. Never use boiling water to apply decals.

Hold the paper the decals are printed on with a pair of tweezers. Make sure you are not gripping a part of the decal itself under the tweezers.

We actually held the paper next to the car and gently slid the graphic onto the car. It is helpful if you get the car wet prior to sliding the graphic to help in positioning it. This will allow you a few seconds to slide the image into the place you want it.

 

Hold the paper the decal is printed on close to the part you are applying the decal to. The edge of the paper must be lying on the edge of the part, so the decal is transferred immediately from paper to part. Using a clean, wet brush, maneuver the decal onto the part and position it accordingly. Ensure that all air bubbles and creases are removed from the decal by pushing them out with the brush.

 

Dry the decal by very gently by dabbing it with a clean paper towel. The decal should be left alone for an hour to allow it to dry completely. Until then, it may be accidentally repositioned. To reposition a partially dry decal, simply apply some warm water with the brush and maneuver it back into position.

 

 

 

A few things we have learned…

  • Remember that whatever paint-removing solvent you use, it must not harm plastic.

We do have a minor issue under the car where the solvent degraded the plastic a little,but it is underneath…

  • Keep all empty sprues when you have finished assembly. They are useful for stirring paint, or making tools that won’t scratch the model you are working on.

These are also helpful for applying glue and you can throw them away when done.

  • Keep all unused decals. You may later find them useful for other models.
  • Some parts are more easily painted while left on the sprue.This is true particularly of very small parts for the engine. He chose to leave some the original color and chrome but that is an artistic choice.
  • A torn decal is not useless. Careful positioning of the damaged portions can restore the decal to a whole appearance.This is where wetting the model can be handy and allow you to slide the decal into position.
  • If your paint is too thick to feed through the airbrush, try diluting it with a small amount of rubbing alcohol. The alcohol thins the paint while it is in the airbrush, but evaporates soon after leaving it.
  • When applying solvents, paints and glues, do so in a well-ventilated area. Observe all warnings and instructions printed on all your materials and tools.
  • Knives and other sharp tools must be handled by experienced and responsible persons only.
  • Small parts may pose a choking hazard to small children and animals.

Blog613

The 4-H Car ….Assembly

posted by RJ 3:41 PM
Thursday, June 13, 2013
  1. Before gluing parts together, always ensure that the contact points are clean and that the parts fit well. When applying the plastic cement, only apply to one of the parts. An excessive amount of plastic cement will not only prolong or prevent proper adhesion, but may also melt and deform the parts. Plastic cement must always be used as conservatively as possible. When gluing clear parts, such as windows or canopies, try to avoid plastic cement. This is because plastic cement can “fog” clear plastic even in areas where not directly applied. For clear parts, use white glue.
  • Gaps between parts may become apparent after assembly. To remove a gap that is too large to overlook, it may become necessary to separate the parts, adjust their fit, and re-adhere. Another option is to fill the gap with modeling putty, or another substance which dries to hardness and can be smoothed and painted over. When applying putty, only the smallest amount is required. An excessive amount will be difficult to remove later and in the case of clear parts, may be impossible to remove without evident damage to the part beneath. Follow the instructions on the packaging and use a plastic tool to apply the putty, so as not to scratch the model.
  • If an assembled part is not adhering properly in some places, it may not be necessary to separate the parts and re-adhere. Another option is to use a liquid plastic cement to re-adhere the parts. By applying a small amount of liquid glue to the outside of the gap, the glue is drawn into the gap by capillary action. It is important not to apply too much glue, for the reasons above, but also because too much glue may remain outside the gap and dry to hard, malformed bubbles. In general, less than a drop will suffice. When the glue has been applied, hold the parts firmly together until proper adhesion is assured.

 

Once two parts are glued together, it may be necessary to clamp them together until the glue sets. This may be done by holding the two parts firmly together with your hands, but you may also use a variety of tools to do the same job. Elastic bands, clothespins, plastic clamps, tape, and wire are all suitable materials. When applying the clamps, make sure that the pressure exerted on the parts is great enough to keep the parts together, but not nearly enough to deform or break them. Also make sure that whatever clamp you choose to use will not scratch the plastic.

 

 

Whether you are a competitive modeler (contest, 4-H, Boy Scouts, etc…) or building for fun the following links offer some great tips and tricks to help you.

http://www.ndsu.edu/fileadmin/4h/FamilyConsumerScience/FE101.pdf

http://www.scaleautomag.com/

 

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Here we are assembling the engine. He used most of the parts from the Stingaree model, he choose to use use the larger exhaust headers found in the Royal Rail model to customize this model. Here he is trying to hold them in place while they dry.

 

Building our model for the fair…

posted by RJ 8:53 AM
Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Well it is that time of year again and we are just starting our fair projects at home. Unfortunately we live in a 3rd floor apartment, which makes painting both inside and outside difficult. To minimize fumes and mess I began to look for options for building a miniature spray booth. I am not endorsing either of these, because I have not completed it yet, but I found 2 sets of instructions for completing this project.

It looks like the materials I will need to complete this project are

1)      Plastic Storage Crate or Similar Size Cardboard Box depending on which set of instructions you choose..mine will depend on whichever box I can find.

2)      An extractor fan – the second set of instructions uses the exhaust hood from a stove. This one seems simplest.

3)      Flexible hose – like for a dryer vent

  • Full instructions are available on the individual pages.

http://www.militarymodelling.com/news/article/homemade-spray-booth/3661/

http://www.interlog.com/~ask/scale/tips/booth.htm

 

This second set also includes some great ideas for cleaning, painting, and preparing your model. Once we get started I will share our photos.hood

ROUND 2, LLC, ACQUIRES LINDBERG & HAWK MODEL KIT BRANDS

posted by RJ 3:21 PM
Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Round 2 to Produce Popular Land, Air, Sea & Space Models – Adding to AMT, MPC & Polar Lights

For Immediate Release

SOUTH BEND, Indiana – 03/18/2013 – Round 2, LLC, is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Lindberg and Hawk Models brands and assets from J. Lloyd International. With the transaction, Round 2 adds these two well-recognized and historic plastic model kit names to their existing trio of AMT, MPC and Polar Lights mode kit lines, licensed from Learning Curve Brands, Inc. in 2008 and purchased outright in 2012.

Consumer trust and excitement has been building over Round 2’s efforts with the initial three brands since 2008. Now, with the assets of five major model companies in its stable, Round 2 solidifies its position as a top producer and fierce competitor in the plastic kit sector of the hobby industry. Thomas Lowe, President and CEO of Round 2 states, “The addition of Lindberg and Hawk results in a combined product catalog for Round 2 that is so diverse, it will include virtually every type of model kit genre imaginable and in a wide range of scales. Whether you’re looking for cars, trucks, aircraft, ships, sci-fi, space exploration, anatomy and figures or even crazy monsters, we now have it all! We’ve made plans to hit the ground running with these brands and are ready to go. As we progress into the future, we will be working with the vintage Hawk and Lindberg tooling to resurrect more exciting kits that haven’t seen the light of day in decades, just like we have with AMT and MPC. We’ll also be happy to put the 1934 Ford Pickup tooling back under the original AMT brand, from where it originated.”

Lowe continues, “Like our customers, we love model building. Lindberg and Hawk models are sure to excite modelers of all ages. From the connection with history to a hunger for an understanding of how various machines, both human and mechanical function, the kits created by the original brands have always offered a wide variety of subject matter for model makers, and we plan on continuing that long standing tradition.
About Round 2

Round 2, LLC is an innovative collectibles company located in South Bend, IN.  The team at Round 2 is dedicated to producing detailed, high quality collectible and playable items appealing to the young and young at heart.  Round 2 brands include Polar Lights®, AMT® and MPC® model kits, Auto World® slot cars, Forever Fun™ seasonal products and the licensed brands American Muscle®, Ertl Collectibles® and Vintage Fuel™ die cast.
For more details on all the product lines produced by Round 2, visit our website at: www.round2corp.com
AMT, Polar Lights, MPC and Round 2 and design are trademarks of Round 2, LLC. ©2011 Round 2, LLC, South Bend, IN 46628. All rights reserved. ###
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